Jehovah’s Witnesses, a Christian group that believes the Bible should be taken literally and opposes any form of violence is banned because of “execution extremist activities.”

Last month, the Ministry asked the Supreme Court Act to ban this religious organization and prevent 175 thousand of its members to disseminate “texts that incite hatred.”

The trial began in Moscow on Tuesday, and the lawyers who represent the movement filed a countersuit asking the Supreme Court to rule that their members are victims of political repression, and the move of the Ministry of Justice declared illegal.

The court ruled that this was not part of his jurisdiction, but did not say in whose jurisdiction is, the Russian Agency for legal information. Eventually the case was postponed to Thursday.

The Ministry claims that the activities of Jehovah’s Witnesses “violating Russian law on combating extremism,” and that their pamphlets cause hatred against other groups.

The representative of Jehovah’s Witnesses Yaroslavl Sivulski the BBC said his movement has nothing to do with extremism and complained that in no case the courts never hear their arguments.

One of the pamphlets quoted writer Leo Tolstoy, who described the doctrine of the Russian Orthodox Church as superstition and sorcery.

This ban is part of attempts by the authorities to remove all religious groups can it compete with the Russian Orthodox Church. Jehovah’s Witnesses are against the desire and intention of Putin to unite all the people of one religion.

Jehovah’s Witnesses are active in Russia over 100 years ago, refusing to serve in the military, do not vote and consider God as their sole leader. Avoid patriotic celebrations promoted by the Government, including the celebration of the Russian annexation of Crimea.

In Russia the group has about 175,000 members and 395 branches throughout the country. Residents belonging to the Jehovah’s Witnesses have the same lists of members of Al Qaeda and ISIS.

About eight million people worldwide are part of this religious movement, and most famous for being go from door to door looking for new members, says the BBC has learned.